UVA in Valencia, U.Va.

UVA in Valencia

A Division of the International Studies Office

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Engineering (fall only)

  • Students have to take at least one Spanish course from the Semester course list.
  • Spanish Prerequisites: Completed at least SPAN 2020-Advanced Intermediate Spanish or the equivalent.

Engineering Course Offering

In addition to their Spanish course/s, students can select from the following University of Virginia direct credit engineering courses:

APMA 2130 Ordinary Differential Equations

APMA 3100 Probability

PHYS 2415/2419 General Physics II with Lab

MAE 2300 Statics

CS 2110 Software Development Methods

SYS 2001 Systems Engineering Concepts

CS 2102 Discrete Mathematics I

ECE/CS 2330 Digital Logic Design

APMA 2130 Ordinary Differential Equations

First order differential equations, second order and higher order linear differential equations, reduction of order, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, series solutions, Laplace transforms, linear systems of first order differential equations and the associated matrix theory, numerical methods. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2120- Multivariable Calculus or equivalent.

APMA 3100 Probability

A calculus-based introduction to probability theory and its applications in engineering and applied science. Includes counting techniques, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distribution functions, expected value and variance, joint distributions, covariance, correlation, the Central Limit theorem, the Poisson process, an introduction to statistical inference. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 - Multivariable Calculus or equivalent.

PHYS 2415 General Physics II

Second semester of introductory physics for engineers. Electrostatics, including conductors and insulators; DC circuits; magnetic forces and fields; magnetic effects of moving charges and currents; electromagnetic induction; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic oscillations and waves. Introduces geometrical and physical optics. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: General Physics I (PHYS 1425) and Calculus I (APMA 1110 or MATH 1320).

PHYS 2419 General Physics II Lab

A required two-hour workshop accompanying PHYS 2419, including laboratory and tutorial activities.

MAE 2300 Statics

Basic concepts of mechanics, systems of forces and couples: equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures: trusses, frames, machines; internal forces, shear and bending moment diagrams; distributed forces; friction, centroids and moments of inertia; introduction to stress and strain; computer applications.

CS 2110 Software Development Methods

A continuation of Intro. to Programming, emphasizing modern software development methods. An introduction to the software development life cycle and processes. Topics include requirements analysis, specification, design, implementation, and verification. Emphasizes the role of the individual programmer in large software development projects.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Programming.

SYS 2001 Systems Engineering Concepts

Three major dimensions of systems engineering will be covered, and their efficacy demonstrated through case studies: (1) The history, philosophy, art, and science upon which systems engineering is grounded; including guiding principles and steps in the 'systems engineering approach' to problem solving; (2) The basic tools of systems engineering analysis, including; goal definition and system representation, requirements analysis, system assessment and evaluation, mathematical modeling, and decision analysis; and (3) system and project planning and management.

CS 2102 Discrete Mathematics I

Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include finite and infinite sets, elementary combinatorial problems, and graph theory. Development of tools and mechanisms for reasoning about discrete problems.

ECE/CS 2330 Digital Logic Design

Includes number systems and conversion; Boolean algebra and logic gates; minimization of switching functions; combinational network design; flip-flops; sequential network design; arithmetic networks. Introduces computer organization and assembly language. Six laboratory assignments.